divorce

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The most distinct difference between separation and divorce is that a divorce legally and permanently terminates the marriage. Once the divorce is final (and subject to any waiting periods establish by the laws of your state), both parties are free to remarry someone else without any repercussions.

A separation, on the other hand, does not terminate the marriage and does not give the parties the right to remarry without first getting a divorce.

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The Florida legislature recently enacted laws that abolished the concept of “primary” and “secondary” child custody as well as “visitation.” The court system was overwhelmed with parents who were fighting not only about at whose home the minor would spend most of his time, but also over who should have the title of primary custodian. Many believed that, if they were deemed the “secondary” custodian, then they were also a second-class parent. Further, many parties resented that they had to “visit” the child rather than live with or spend time with their kin. In an effort to help parents avoid fighting over semantics, the Florida legislature adopted the concept of “time-sharing” to replace the old regime of awarding custody to one parent or the other.

The Florida Legislature also modified and expanded the factors that courts must consider when making a determination on the issue of time-sharing. The overriding concern remains the best interests of the child. There are now twenty factors for consideration, some of which are highlighted below:

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What is the definition of child custody in this state? Who is entitled to that custody? Which state has jurisdiction and can children be moved out of that state? What can the party do if a spouse or ex. is in danger of removing the child from the court ordered environment.

Custody, in Florida means being responsible for the needs of a person under the age of 18; this can be further defined by the physical care and supervision of the child. The custodian has a court order for the right of physical custody along with the duty to rear, keep safe and discipline their charge. Medical, food, shelter, education and other material needs are to be provided.

For more information on child custody florida click here

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The Florida legislature recently enacted laws that abolished the concept of “primary” and “secondary” child custody as well as “visitation.” The court system was overwhelmed with parents who were fighting not only about at whose home the minor would spend most of his time, but also over who should have the title of primary custodian. Many believed that, if they were deemed the “secondary” custodian, then they were also a second-class parent. Further, many parties resented that they had to “visit” the child rather than live with or spend time with their kin. In an effort to help parents avoid fighting over semantics, the Florida legislature adopted the concept of “time-sharing” to replace the old regime of awarding custody to one parent or the other.

The Florida Legislature also modified and expanded the factors that courts must consider when making a determination on the issue of time-sharing. The overriding concern remains the best interests of the child. There are now twenty factors for consideration, some of which are highlighted below:

For more information on child custody laws florida click here

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Florida law requires Parenting Plans for all divorcing couples with children starting October 1, 2008. Florida law divides parenting issues into three categories: parental responsibility, time sharing and support. This article examines the support section of a parenting plan.

Both parents have a legal requirement to support their children, regardless of the parents’ marital status. Florida has a formula to calculate child support in Florida Statute 61.30. The calculation involves using the total of both parents’ net monthly incomes and the chart in Florida Statute 61.30, to find the “guideline amount” of child support. This is the amount the court will presume is correct. It is the total amount that will be apportioned between the parents based on their incomes.

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Marriage related background checks can give you full disclosure on a person’s past as it relates to marriage and/or divorce. Most marriage and divorce records search sites compile their data from state and local government agencies, as this information is considered open to the public, and freely and legally shared over the internet. The best sites will gather data from multiple sources to achieve the highest ration of return on Florida divorce records searches possible. Other searches which can be used with some success include going to the courts themselves or to churches.

If you wish to conduct your search in person in the hopes of tracking down official certified documents, you’ll need to know in what state and area the marriage took place in, or at least take a guess and begin there. Only the court or church where the marriage/divorce was conducted will have records of the official documentation. If you don’t know this information, you also have the option of searching public records online through the county registry for Florida divorce records, which you can attempt with as little information as a name, though the more information you have on the parties involved in the marriage/divorce, or the dates surrounding it, the better off you’ll be at obtaining information quicker, and with more accuracy.

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The Florida legislature recently enacted laws that abolished the concept of “primary” and “secondary” child custody as well as “visitation.” The court system was overwhelmed with parents who were fighting not only about at whose home the minor would spend most of his time, but also over who should have the title

of primary custodian. Many believed that, if they were deemed the “secondary” custodian, then they were also a second-class parent. Further, many parties resented that they had to “visit” the child rather than live with or spend time with their kin. In an effort to help parents avoid fighting over semantics, the Florida legislature adopted the concept of “time-sharing” to replace the old regime of awarding custody to one parent or the other.

The Florida Legislature also modified and expanded the factors that courts must consider when making a determination on the issue of time-sharing. The overriding concern remains the best interests of the child. There are now twenty factors for consideration, some of which are highlighted below:

For more information on child custody laws florida click here

Filed under child custody in florida by on . Comment#

0

What is the definition of child custody in this state? Who is entitled to that custody? Which state has jurisdiction and can children be moved out of that state? What can the party do if a spouse or ex. is in danger of removing the child from the court ordered environment.

Custody, in Florida means being responsible for the needs of a person under the age of 18; this can be further defined by the physical care and supervision of the child. The custodian has a court order for the right of physical custody along with the duty to rear, keep safe and discipline their charge.

Medical, food, shelter, education and other material needs are to be provided.

For more information on child custody in florida click here

Filed under child custody in florida by on . Comment#